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WAVE ROCK MOTEL - ROCK MOTEL


Wave Rock Motel - Hotel Grand Krakow - Hamptom Inn East



Wave Rock Motel





wave rock motel






    wave rock
  • Wave Rock is a natural rock formation located east of the small town of Hyden in Western Australia. It derives its name from the fact that it is shaped like a tall breaking ocean wave.





    motel
  • A motel is a hotel designed for motorists, and usually has a parking area for motor vehicles. They are common in the United States.

  • Motel is the debut album by the Mexican soul-rock band, of the same name. The album was released in March 28, 2006, in Mexico, their homeland. And later, after four months, the album was released in countries like Guatemala, Venezuela, Chile, and the United States.

  • A roadside hotel designed primarily for motorists, typically having the rooms arranged in a low building with parking directly outside

  • a motor hotel











Rock form frames rock form




Rock form frames rock form





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Toadstools. A place I hiked to in 2008 but the early morning light on this visit made it a very special place indeed. They have improved the easily accessible trailhead with a new sign and some free informative pamphlets. Well worth a stop when traveling through the area.

The trailhead for the toadstools is on Utah highway 89 1.4 miles east of the BLM Paria rangers’ station (where the Wave lotteries are held) and just 1.6 miles west of the south terminus to the fun dirt “Cottonwood Road”.

In the Grand Canyon there are at least two layers (representing millions of years) that are gone. They were eroded away before the next “new” layer was added on top. This is called an “unconformity” by geologists. I knew about the Grand Canyon unconformities but I had no idea that an unconformity played a roll in the formation of the “toadstool” area here along highway 89.

Paraphrasing the good information in the small trail pamphlet:
[The “bottom” layer of rocks at the toadstools is around 160 millions old (The Entrada Formation). The top layer is 97 million years old and called the Dakota Formation. In between once resided the Morrison Formation (the middle of the rock sandwich), but it was eroded completely away before the Dakota Formation rocks made their appearance].

The boundaries between rock layers at the toadstool are noticeably “tilted” in places and there are dramatic differences in the color and texture of different layers. So, an interesting geological history and some worthy for photo ops formations as a result. Plan to take your camera on the very short hike to this place, if you haven’t already been.

0 ACTIVITIES DAY TEN OF TWELVE 0

If there was one day to “live again” on this road trip then day TEN was it. It was outstanding from start to finish. The weather was A1 perfect. We had a little dirt road travel with the windows of the Jeep rolled down and a lot of good photo ops at the many different places we traveled. Oh yes, a great meal at the Escalante Outfitters to end the day properly.

We left Page, Arizona before dawn. We watched the sun come up over Navajo Mountain and Lake Powell. Then on to “The Toadstools” off highway 89 for a short hike and some great early morning light on those formations. We then backtracked 1.6 miles fto the Cottonwood road (a road I had driven recently in my pickup truck, only from north to south), and enjoyed a clear warm blue sky day drive up to Butler (Grosvenor) arch.

From Butler arch, we went on to Kodachrome Basin, where we took a short three mile loop hike. I loved the campground at Kodachrome and have promised my wife that we will camp there together and take some of the longer hikes available in that pretty little state park (Oh yes, the campground has HOT showers).


from Kodachrome Basin state park, we drove up to Bryce National Park. LOTS of snow, but beautiful on a sunny day (few other people). We ate at the Subway just outside Ruby Inn - then drove on to Rainbow Point, which at 9,100 feet, had plenty of snow (about three feet worth along the lookout path).

Then we worked our way back out Bryce, stopping to photograph at each and every lookout point that had been plowed, enjoying Bryce as the sun dropped down low and the light changed by the minute.

After Bryce we backtracked again and drove on to Escalante, Utah (one of my often visited and favorite “base camps”), where we had reserved rooms by phone at the rustic but friendly: Circle “D” motel (ask for Robert and tell him Oldmantravels with the old red Toyota pickup truck sent you).

After checking in at the Circle “D”, we headed over to the Escalante Outfitters ( hiking supply, books, free internet use, excellent food, really friendly people cafe) - - for a big dinner a cold beer, pizza, and a “toast” to the best road trip day we had enjoyed thus far.

We had LOTS of dirt road destinations in mind for day 11 of the road trip (the next day) BUT we were in for quite a surprise the next morning at Escalante. So like on all good road trips, you stay flexible, make the best of what comes your way, and go for it and that is exactly what we did.

0 3,875 MILE/12 DAY ~ 4 CORNERS ROAD TRIP OVERVIEW 0

At the start of year 2011, I made tentative plans to take a two week solo “road trip” through the Four Corners area (The Colorado Plateau), during the last half of March. Then, if my wife could get the time needed off from her part time job, I also planned a “road trip” vacation to the Southwest, in April with her.

When I put the plan together for the March trip, I decided to see if an old friend of mine, Ed (Flickr’s: OldWrangler), might be interested in joining me. I volunteered to take my old four wheel drive pickup truck and split the gasoline expense with him. We would each get an inexpensive motel room on the road to serve as “base camps” to hike, photograph, and explore back roads in the Four Corners area.

Not only did Ed accept but he also proposed that we take his brand











Bisti rock art display




Bisti rock art display





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Many of the interesting rock forms at the Bisti Wilderness, just didn't look like they would last much longer. They looked fragile and vunerable, but here they stand.

0 ACTIVITIES DAY FIVE OF TWELVE 0

After a good night’s rest at Farmington, New Mexico we left at dawn, as was our custom on this trip, with three major destinations in mind: Bisti (pronounced: Biss Tie) badlands; Chaco Canyon; and Bandelier national monument. We had motel rooms reserved at Santa Fe.

The hike into the rock and clay formations at Bisti turned out to be my favorite stop on the entire road trip. I had never been there before. We were the only ones there, the weather was bright and clear, and the formations were absolutely amazing. I used my small Garmin etrex to make certain that we would hike to one of the two “good spots” and back out, in the most time efficient manner.

There is another good section of Bisti that I know, one day, I will return to visit. Same with the De-Na-Zin area. Always something for another road trip. After Bisti we made our way to Chaco Canyon and visited Chetro Ketl and Pueblo Bonito. I had been to Chaco three times before but never in a situation where I wasn’t rushed for time. Ed and I enjoyed our walks to both ruins and took our time.

After Chaco Canyon it was clear (using the ETA on the NUVI navigator), that we weren’t going to make Bandelier with enough light to really enjoy it, so for the first and only time on this road trip, we altered our route solely as a result of “running out of time”. There were several times we altered plans due to weather and dirt (mud) road conditions.

So instead of traveling the highways that would lead us to Bandelier from Chaco, we checked the map and took a scenic but more direct highway into Santa Fe (highway 96 instead of highway 4 that would have taken us to Santa Fe via Bandelier).

We got into Santa Fe right at dark, in time to check out the historic town square, the cathedral, and get a good meal. The next morning would follow a now established and predictable routine: On each and every day of this road trip, Ed and I would load our gear back in the Jeep right at or just before dawn, always looking forward to the new day’s destinations. The way a road trip should be.

0 3,875 MILE/12 DAY ~ 4 CORNERS ROAD TRIP OVERVIEW 0

At the start of year 2011, I made tentative plans to take a two week solo “road trip” through the Four Corners area (The Colorado Plateau), during the last half of March. Then, if my wife could get the time needed off from her part time job, I also planned a “road trip” vacation to the Southwest, in April with her.

When I put the plan together for the March trip, I decided to see if an old friend of mine, Ed (Flickr’s: OldWrangler), might be interested in joining me. I volunteered to take my old four wheel drive pickup truck and split the gasoline expense with him. We would each get an inexpensive motel room on the road to serve as “base camps” to hike, photograph, and explore back roads in the Four Corners area.

Not only did Ed accept but he also proposed that we take his brand new 4-door Jeep Wrangler instead of my old pickup truck. That didn’t take any thinking on my part. I LOVE Jeeps and Ed and I have always got along well (decades ago, I worked for him and we had taken a fun road trip together back in 2008, along with my friend John and my youngest son). The deal was sealed.

We left my house in Central Washington early Monday morning on the 14th of March. We returned 12 days and 3,875 miles later on Friday evening March 25th. We spent a lot of time drinking Diet Pepsi from the ice chest and keeping the hits of the 60s (and occasionally the 70s), cranked up high on the Jeep’s Sirius satellite radio sound system. Sing along music! “Road trip” tunes.

Weather often dictated changes to our proposed route and activities. We stayed flexible, and in the end we visited the large majority of places we had hoped to see, when the road trip began. We had sun and clear skies, snow, dust storms, and high winds at times. Ed’s Jeep had an outside temperature display. We drove in everything from18 degree weather to temperatures in the 70s in New Mexico.

Here in outline form are the places we saw, hiked, photographed, and visited during the 12 day road trip:

Mon 3.14.11
* Interstate travel from my house in Central Washington to Lehi, Utah

Tue 3.15.11
* Scenic back roads ( Hwys: 6, 89, & 31) from Spanish Fork to Huntington, Utah
* Dirt road travel to “The Wedge” and down Buckhorn Wash to I-70.
* Side trip to the Head of Sinbad petroglyph and then on to Moab.

Wed 3.16.11
* Island in the Sky district of Canyonlands NP (Mesa Arch & Upheaval Dome)
* The Shafer “Jeep” Trail down to the White Rim road and back to Moab.
* Hike to Delicate Arch & visit Windows section in Arches NP.

Thu 3.17.11
* Newspaper Rock in the Needles district of Canyonlands NP
* Attempt back road travel thru the Abajo Mountains to Montic









wave rock motel







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